IBPS PO Prelims English Language Questions 2019 (Day-4)

Dear Aspirants, Our IBPS Guide team is providing a new series of English Language Questions for IBPS PO Prelims 2019 so the aspirants can practice it on a daily basis. These questions are framed by our skilled experts after understanding your needs thoroughly. Aspirants can practice these new series questions daily to familiarize with the exact exam pattern and make your preparation effective.

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[WpProQuiz 6920]

Direction (1-5): The following question consists of a sentence which is divided into three parts which contain grammatical errors in one or more than one part of the sentence, as specified in bold in each part. If there is an error in any part of the sentence, find the correct alternative to replace those parts from the three options given below each question to make the sentence grammatically correct. If the given sentence is grammatically correct or does not require any correction, choose (E), i.e “No correction required” as your answer.

1) But, said Swain, once you hit the coast of the Arctic Ocean and heading north, (a)/you tend to not getting strong updrafts nor enough atmospheric instability (b)/to produce lightning-capable clouds (c)/

a) And heading north

b) To not getting strong updrafts

c) To produce

A) Only a

B) Both a and b

C) Only c

D) Both b and c

E) No correction required

2) And this lack of a cookie-cutter template make it hard (a)/to distinguish foreshock sequences from earthquake clusters (b)/that were not followed by a big quake(c)/

a) Template make it hard

b) Sequences from earthquake clusters

c) Were not followed by

A) Only a

B) Both a and b

C) Only c

D) Both b and c

E) No correction required

3) Almost every seismically active country have earthquake monitoring programs, (a)/so this type of analysis could be repeated elsewhere—especially in Japan, (b)/where the seismic data is of the same quality as those for Southern California (c)/

a) Every seismically active country have

b) Could be repeated elsewhere

c) Seismic data is of the same quality

A) Only a

B) Both a and b

C) Only c

D) Both a and c

E) No correction required

4) For now, geologists are very careful to note that (a)/this result is only a first step, and we’re still a long way from (b)/forecasting earthquakes with any degree of confidences (c)/

a) Very careful to note

b) Still a long way from

c) With any degree of confidences

A) Only a

B) Both a and b

C) Only c

D) Both b and c

E) No correction required

5) Historically, even during the summer, Arctic waters were frozen solid, (a)/said Swain,that’s increasingly no longer the case, and this summer, (b)/portions of the ocean basin have no ice at all (c)/

a) Arctic waters were

b) Increasingly no longer the case

c) Portions of the ocean basin have

A) Only a

B) Both a and b

C) Only c

D) Both b and c

E) No correction required

Direction (6-10): Given bellow are six statements A, B, C, D, E and F, which when arranged in the correct order, form a coherent and meaningful paragraph. The sentence marked as E is fixed and would fit in the fourth position. Rearrange the other statements in a proper sequence to form a meaningful paragraph, then answer the questions below.

A) Ryan Said, a research scientist with Vaisala and the inventor of the GLD360 system, explained that lightning had been reported within 300 nautical miles of the North Pole before. Between 2012 and 2017, there was no more than one single day each summer where lightning was seen within this range, and sometimes none was detected. In those years, the most discharges recorded in that area in a single day was six.

B) “It has been an extraordinary year and an extraordinary summer in the far north,” says Daniel Swain, a climate scientist at the University of California, Los Angeles. Weird things are happening in the Arctic, and quirky lightning is yet another peculiarity to add to the growing list.

C) Although plenty of factors needed to come together to produce the lightshow, the specter of climate change lingers over this meteorological mystery. It is possible that a freakishly warm Arctic, a staggering lack of sea ice, and even possibly smoke from unprecedented wildfires within the Arctic Circle, among other things, contributed to this lightning’s unexpected appearance near the top of the world.

D) That’s why it took scientists by surprise when dozens of lightning strikes were detected within 300 nautical miles of the North Pole this past weekend. In fact, it was so unusual that it was highlighted on Twitter by the National Weather Service’s office in Fairbanks, Alaska. A bulletin of theirs said this was “one of the furthest north lightning strikes in Alaska forecaster memory.”

E) The lightning was detected by Vaisala’s GLD360 network, which uses a worldwide distribution of GPS-synchronized radio receivers that pick up on the powerful radio bursts lightning discharges unleash. Individual sensors can detect such radio bursts 6,000 miles away from their sources, which allows the network to spot lightning anywhere on Earth, including the remotest Arctic.

F) Lightning happens all the time, but certain parts of the world get far less of it than others, including near the North Pole. Lightning requires atmospheric instability, something that’s set up when cold, parched air sits atop warmer, wetter air. At very high latitudes, that hotter, damper air tends not to show up.

6) Which of the following will be LAST sentence after rearrangement?

A) D

B) A

C) F

D) E

E) None of these

7) Which of the following will be FIRST sentence after rearrangement?

A) B

B) C

C) F

D) A

E) None of these

8) Which of the following pairs form two consecutive statements after rearrangement?

A) A-D

B) B-C

C) B-E

D) C-D

E) None of these

9) Which of the following will be FOURTH sentence after rearrangement?

A) D

B) C

C) B

D) A

E) None of these

10) Which of the following will be THIRD sentence after rearrangement?

A) D

B) E

C) F

D) A

E) None of these

Answers:

Directions (1-5):

1) Answer: b)

Replace ‘heading’ with ‘head’ and ‘getting’ with ‘get’ to make the sentence grammatically correct.

But, said Swain, once you hit the coast of the Arctic Ocean and head north, you tend not to get strong updrafts nor enough atmospheric instability to produce lightning-capable clouds.

2) Answer: a)

Use ‘makes’ in place of make’, because the subject is singular here.

And this lack of a cookie-cutter template makes it hard to distinguish foreshock sequences from earthquake clusters that were not followed by a big quake.

3) Answer: d)

With country, we should use ‘has’ and not ‘have. And with ‘data’, which is plural, we should use ‘are’.

Almost every seismically active country has earthquake monitoring programs, so this type of analysis could be repeated elsewhere—especially in Japan, where the seismic data are of the same quality as those for Southern California.

4) Answer: c)

Use ‘confidence’ in place of ‘confidences’.

For now, geologists are very careful to note that this result is only a first step, and we’re still a long way from forecasting earthquakes with any degree of confidence.

5) Answer: e)

Historically, even during the summer, Arctic waters were frozen solid, said Swain. That’s increasingly no longer the case, and this summer, portions of the ocean basin have no ice at all.

Directions (6-10):

The correct sequence of the paragraph should be FDCBEA

F) Lightning happens all the time, but certain parts of the world get far less of it than others, including near the North Pole. Lightning requires atmospheric instability, something that’s set up when cold, parched air sits atop warmer, wetter air. At very high latitudes, that hotter, damper air tends not to show up.

D) That’s why it took scientists by surprise when dozens of lightning strikes were detected within 300 nautical miles of the North Pole this past weekend. In fact, it was so unusual that it was highlighted on Twitter by the National Weather Service’s office in Fairbanks, Alaska. A bulletin of theirs said this was “one of the furthest north lightning strikes in Alaska forecaster memory.”

C) Although plenty of factors needed to come together to produce the lightshow, the specter of climate change lingers over this meteorological mystery. It is possible that a freakishly warm Arctic, a staggering lack of sea ice, and even possibly smoke from unprecedented wildfires within the Arctic Circle, among other things, contributed to this lightning’s unexpected appearance near the top of the world.

B) “It has been an extraordinary year and an extraordinary summer in the far north,” says Daniel Swain, a climate scientist at the University of California, Los Angeles. Weird things are happening in the Arctic, and quirky lightning is yet another peculiarity to add to the growing list.

E) The lightning was detected by Vaisala’s GLD360 network, which uses a worldwide distribution of GPS-synchronized radio receivers that pick up on the powerful radio bursts lightning discharges unleash. Individual sensors can detect such radio bursts 6,000 miles away from their sources, which allows the network to spot lightning anywhere on Earth, including the remotest Arctic.

A) Ryan Said, a research scientist with Vaisala and the inventor of the GLD360 system, explained that lightning had been reported within 300 nautical miles of the North Pole before. Between 2012 and 2017, there was no more than one single day each summer where lightning was seen within

6) Answer: b)

7) Answer: c)

8) Answer: c)

9) Answer: c)

10) Answer: e)

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