“20-20” English Question | Crack SBI Clerk 2018 Day-42

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“20-20” English Questions | Crack SBI Clerk 2018 (Day-42)

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Topic Daily Publishing Time
Daily News Papers & Editorials 8.00 AM
Current Affairs Quiz 9.00 AM
Logical Reasoning 10.00 AM
Quantitative Aptitude “20-20” 11.00 AM
Vocabulary (Based on The Hindu) 12.00 PM
Static GK Quiz 1.00 PM
English Language “20-20” 2.00 PM
Banking Awareness Quiz 3.00 PM
Reasoning Puzzles & Seating 4.00 PM
Daily Current Affairs Updates 5.00 PM
Data Interpretation / Application Sums (Topic Wise) 6.00 PM
Reasoning Ability “20-20” 7.00 PM
English Language (New Pattern Questions) 8.00 PM
General / Financial Awareness Quiz 9.00 PM

Directions (Q. 1-10): Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions. Certain words/ phrases are given in bold to help you locate them while answering some of the questions.
Communal politics, which ironically passes for secularism in this country, has been the bane of Indian politics. It can be traced back to the British policy of ‘divide and rule’, the result of which was Partition. The Constitution was a repudiation of these ideas and the politics that perpetuated them. It rejected the suggestions for a separate electorate for the minorities and the proportional representation system, which it felt would lead to a perpetually enervated nation. But in most policies that have been followed until now, we have seen furtherance of vote-bank politics. The narrative has to change. The recent PIL filed by a Jammu-based advocate, Ankur Sharma, in the Supreme Court, alleging that the rights of religious and linguistic minorities in the State are being “siphoned off illegally and arbitrarily” and the subsequent affidavits by the Central and Jammu and Kashmir governments give us a chance to look again into the secularism versus communalism debate.While Articles 29 and 30 of the Constitution guarantee certain rights to minorities for protection of their culture, script, and languages, the Constitution has not defined or identified religious and linguistic minorities. The question of who will determine which group is a minority was also left unanswered until the Supreme Court settled this in TMA Pai Foundation v. State of Karnataka, wherein it held that theunit for the purpose of determining the definition of minority would be the State, not the whole of India.The setting up of a Minorities Commission was envisaged in 1978 to ensure that minorities are able to enjoy the safeguards provided for them in the Constitution and various Central and State laws. The National Commission for Minorities Act was passed in 1992 to give a statutory backing to the Commission. According to Section 1 (ii) of the Act, it extends to the whole of India except Jammu and Kashmir, and as per Section 2 (iii), ‘minority’ means a community notified as such by the Central government. Using this power, the Central government through a gazette notification dated October 23, 1993 notified Muslims, Christians, Sikhs, Buddhists and Zoroastrians (Parsis) as ‘minorities’ for the purpose of this Act. Jains were declared as a minority later.According to the 2011 Census, out of 28 States (Andhra Pradesh had not been bifurcated yet) and seven Union Territories, Hindus are a religious minority in seven States (Arunachal Pradesh, Jammu and Kashmir, Manipur, Meghalaya, Mizoram, Nagaland, Punjab) and in one UT (Lakshadweep). In J&K, Hindus have been at the receiving end of majoritarian wrath, and the constitutional guarantee of liberty of thought, expression, belief, faith and worship is being violated there. The status of West Pakistan refugees, who had migrated there at the time of Partition, is also relevant. Reports suggest that there are about 2.5 lakh Hindus. They are not recognised as state subjects and are denied the most basic human rights.

 1). What can be true regarding communal politics?

  1. Communal politics have the policy of divide and rule.
  2. Communal politics have no place in our constitution.
  3. Communal politics is done for the vote bank.
  1. Only 1
  2. Only 2
  3. Only 3
  4. 1 & 2
  5. All of the above

2). Why the debate on secularism versus communalism can be started again?

  1. Rights of religious and linguistic minorities are taken out.
  2. Communal politics give us a chance to debate.
  3. Vote bank politics violates the right.
  1. Only 1
  2. Only 2
  3. Only 3
  4. 1 & 2
  5. All of the above

3). What can be true regarding constitution of India?

  1. Constitution of India guarantee some rights to minorities for protection of their culture, script, and language.
  2. Constitution of India have no definitions of religious and linguistic minorities.
  3. Constitution of India consists separate electorate system.
  1. Only 1
  2. Only 2
  3. Only 3
  4. 1 & 2
  5. All of the above

4). What can be the most suitable title for the passage?

  1. Constitution of India
  2. Communal politics
  3. Condition of minorities in Jammu and Kashmir
  4. Minorities and their status
  5. Definition of minority

5). What is true regarding minority commission?

  1. It gets legal support by the Minorities Act
  2. It works on the basis of constitution and central and state laws.
  3. It defined the religious and linguistic minorities.
  1. Only 1
  2. Only 2
  3. Only 3
  4. 1 & 2
  5. All of the above

Directions (Questions- 06 to 09): Choose the word/group of words which is MOST SIMILAR in meaning to the word/group of words printed in bold as used in the passage.

6). Majoritarian wrath

  1. Anger of majority
  2. Major population
  3. Benefits of majority
  4. Problems of majority
  5. None of the above

7). Envisaged

  1. Predicted
  2. Formed
  3. Authorized
  4. Came in action
  5. None of the above

8). Bane

  1. Ruination
  2. Boon
  3. Curse
  4. Problem
  5. None of the above

9). Siphoned off

  1. Taken out
  2. Shaken
  3. Harassed
  4. Violated
  5. None of the above

Directions (Questions- 10): Choose the word/group of words which is MOST OPPOSITE in meaning of the word/group of words printed in bold as used in the passage.

10). Enervated

  1. Invigorated
  2. Debilitated
  3. Weakened
  4. Indisposed
  5. None of the above

Directions: (Q 11-15): In given questions a paragraph is given with some phrases/idioms/words in bold. Choose the options which can replace them correctly. If no change is required select none of these.

11. In 2005 a debate raged between the two most powerful figures in President Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva’s government. Antonio Palocci, the finance minister, proposed taking advantage of faster economic growth to eliminate Brazil’s persistent fiscal deficit—and thus lower its exorbitant interest rates—by capping the increase in federal spending. But Dilma Rousseff, Lula’s chief of staff, thought Mr Palocci’s plan “rudimentary” and blocked it. Ms Rousseff became Lula’s successor as Brazil’s president in 2011, implementing a “new economic model” that placed full employment and wage increases ahead of macroeconomic rigour. Fiscal laxity has come back to haunt Ms Rousseff, who won a second term last month by the narrowest of margins. As we went to press she was due to announce that Joaquim Levy, one of Mr Palocci’s deputies in 2005, will become her new finance minister. Nelson Barbosa, the most capable economist in the ruling Workers’ Party (PT), will get the planning ministry. Mr Levy is a Chicago-trained economist who has been running a big asset manager; his premise appointment has been welcomed by investors. It seems that Ms Rousseff has at last tacitly accepted the error of her economic ways. She won the election by pointing to Brazil’s full employment and continuing increase in real incomes. But these achievements were bought by mortgaging the future. Despite mediocre growth, most of Brazil’s economic indicators have moved in the wrong direction under Ms Rousseff. Inflation is over 6%, well above the Central Bank’s target of 4.5%, even though the government held down energy prices. Consumer confidence is at a six year low. The current-account deficit has widened to 3.7% of GDP and the real has been weakening.

a) a priority

b) flimsy

c) conceived

d) far-fetched

e) None of these.

12. Returning to Kabul after a long absence, your correspondent recalled an evening four years ago in the Afghan capital. It was spent in L’Atmosphère, a restaurant arranged around a swimming-pool and packed, as it usually was, with aid workers, contractors and spies. Cosmopolitan, high-spirited and well-paid, many had been whooping it up in Kabul for years: rebuilding Afghanistan was a blast. Against the trance music and chatter of ski trips to Bamiyan province, a wise Afghan hand looked about, and muttered: “This can’t go on.” Most of the foreigners have left now, owing to shrinking aid budgets and rising insecurity. Those who remain mainly live in enfeebled compounds, invisible to most Afghans. Restaurants, bars and guesthouses have closed for want of business, especially since a Taliban suicide-bomb attack in January on another popular restaurant, Taverna du Liban, killed 18 foreigners. So thousands of cooks, drivers and translators—a source of goodwill for the chaotic international effort—have lost their jobs. “L’Atmos” is still open, but pitiably diminished; its supply of French food and wines having been withdrawn with the French peacekeepers who provided them. The drawdown of the NATO force they were part of—from 130,000 troops a year ago to around 12,000 by the year’s end—is the main reason for the shrinking aid effort. To a degree, this represents a return to normality. With its promises of prosperity and gender equality, the reconstruction effortal ways appeared in pursuit of the unattainable. After the American invasion in 2001 it made vast early strides; under the Taliban, only 3% of girls went to school, now the UN estimates that more than one third do. Yet progress has slowed considerably. Despite the intervention’s huge cost— estimated at a trillion dollars, or $30,000 for every Afghan—the country’s poverty rate has been stuck, at 36%, for almost a decade. It is even rising in places, such as north-eastern Afghanistan, which are relatively untouched by the Taliban insurgency that is ravaging most of the country

a) attenuated

b) bastioned

c) sapped

d) enervated

e) None of these.

13. Political stability is essential not least for the economy. In the first post-Taliban decade, it grew at an annualised rate of9%. With swelling tax receipts, government revenues rose from 3% of GDP in 2002 to a promising 11.5% in 2011. Yet two years of trepidation, over the election and insurgency, have caused economic havoc. Output is expected to grow by 1.5% this year, less than the population. As a result, the government expects a $500m hole in its budget, which it will beseech donors to fill. In Shari Now park, central Kabul, the lean times are manifest in crowds of idle men, fighting partridges, playing board games, or staring into space. Muhammad Akram, a 47-year-old father of four playing a local form of draughts, lost his job as a guard for a German NGO two years ago. Like many of the idlers, he is a fan of Mr Ghani. “But we need jobs and security and we are waiting to see ifhe can deliver.” With 400,000 new job-seekers each year, Afghanistan needs employment-generating growth. To reassure investors, Mr Ghani has promised a crackdown on corruption; he has already announced a plan to retry the main accused in the country’s biggest scam, the theft of almost a billion dollars from Kabul Bank. He also promises liberalising reforms: for example, to the land registry, in an effort to break the land mafia and spur construction

a) chasm

b) berate

c) dekalitre

d) drat

e) None of these.

14. There is a saying in Japan that a monkey that falls from a tree is still a monkey, but a member of parliament who falls is a nobody. Apart from some opportunities in a tiny lobbying industry, there are few prospects for cast-aside politicians. So an approaching snap election on December 14th is sparking anxiety in the Liberal Democratic Party (LDP)—except, that is, among a swelling class of politicians who owe their positions in no small part to family connections. Botchan, or well-born “brats”, are prevalent in Japanese politics. More than two fifths of LDP legislators are occupying safe seats in the Diet, Japan’s parliament, that were once held by fathers, grandfathers, uncles or in-laws. The total number in both houses of the Diet across all parties is climbing again, after a recent sharp fall in the lower house. They have to compete for their relatives’ seats, but they are normally a dirge. Eight out of 19 members of the cabinet have relatives who were in the Diet or in local politics. There are numerous advantages in taking up a family member’s position: a ready formed electoral machine of koenkai, or local supporters, and immediate name-recognition which makes it easier to win elections.

a) shellacking

b) lump

c) drubbing

d) blowout

e) None of these.

15. The killing and incarceration of people on flimsy accusations of insulting Islam has long shamed Pakistan. Hundreds, often members of religious minorities, have been ensnared by blasphemy laws that leave victims with little chance of defending themselves against malicious claims. Cowed judges are unwilling to examine evidence for fear of profanities being repeated in their courtrooms. Outside the courts, mobs can be quickly incited to acts of murder by fire-breathing mullahs. Accusations of impiety soar: just one in 2011; over 100 in 2014. More than half of the 62 people murdered in the wake of blasphemy allegations since 1990 were killed in the past five years, according to figures collated by a Pakistani human-rights group that fears even to be identified. “Blasphemy” can now include spelling errors by children or throwing away a visiting-card bearing the name “Muhammad”. On November 25th a judge in Gilgit-Baltistan sentenced the owner of Geo, Pakistan’s biggest private television channel, to 26 years in jail for broadcasting a popular Sufi song about the prophet during a light entertainment show.

a) enshrine

b) reverence

c) sanctification

d) esteem

e) None of these.

 

Directions: (Q 16-20): A set of six sentences is given below. The sentences are labelled as A, B, C, D, E and F. Rearrange the following sentences to form a meaningful paragraph and then answer the questions that follow.

  1. Further, lenders shall identify incipient stress in loan accounts, immediately on default, by classifying stressed assets as Special Mention Accounts (SMA).
  2. The central bank has withdrawn the existing resolution frameworks and the Joint Lenders’ Forum (JLF) with immediate effect.
  3. The Reserve Bank of India (RBI) scrapped numerous loan restructuring programmes, asking banks to immediately identify defaults and make disclosures every Friday to the RBI credit registry, starting from February 23.
  4. Lenders shall report credit information, including classification of an account as SMA to Central Repository of Information on Large Credits (CRILC) on all borrower entities having aggregate exposure of Rs 50 million (Rs 5 crore) and above with them.
  5. The apex bank has also warned banks of monetary penalties and higher provisions if they are found to have violated the stringent new norms.
  6. The extant instructions on resolution of stressed assets such as Framework for Revitalising Distressed Assets, Corporate Debt Restructuring Scheme, Flexible Structuring of Existing Long Term Project Loans, Strategic Debt Restructuring Scheme (SDR), Change in Ownership outside SDR, and Scheme for Sustainable Structuring of Stressed Assets (S4A) stand withdrawn with immediate effect.
  1. Which of the following is 4th statement after rearrangement?

a) F

b) A

c) B

d) C

e) E

  1. Which of the following is 6th statement after rearrangement?

a) C

b) D

c) A

d) E

e) None of the above

  1. Which of the following is 1st statement after rearrangement?

a) A

b) B

c) D

d) C

e) E

  1. Which of the following is 2nd statement after rearrangement?

a) F

b) A

c) B

d) C

e) E

  1. Which of the following statement follows “F” after rearrangement?

a) F

b) A

c) B

d) C

e) E

Answers:

Directions: (Q 1-10):

1). All of the above are true as given in the passage.

Answer: E

2). According to PIL rights of minorities are taken out that’s why debate can be started.

Answer: A

3). Constitution of India does not consist separate electorate system.

Answer: D

4). Mostly minorities their right and their condition is discussed in this passage.

Answer: D

5). Minority commission did not define religious community.

Answer: D

6). Majoritarian wrath means anger of majority.

Answer: A

7). Envisaged means predicted.

Answer: A

8). Bane means ruination.

Answer: A

9). Siphoned off means removed by someone or taken out.

Answer: A

10). Enervated means exahausted.

Answer: A

 

Directions: (Q 11-15):

  1. Correct Answer is: c)

The passage here wants to convey that his appointment was presumed. ‘Conceivable’ is synonym for the same. Hence, option c is correct.

  1. Correct Answer is: b)

The passage here wants to convey that they lived in fortified compounds. ‘bastioned’ is synonym for the same.

  1. Correct Answer is: e)

The passage here wants to convey that they were begged for something. Beseech is synonym for the same. Hence, no change is required. Option e is answer.

  1. Correct Answer is: d)

The passage here wants to convey the message that they normally have a sure thing. Blowout is synonym for the same. Hence, option d is correct.

  1. Correct Answer is: e)

 

Directions: (Q 16-20):

  1. Correct Answer is: a)

The correct order of the sentences after rearrangement is CEBFAD

  1. Correct Answer is: b)

The correct order of the sentences after rearrangement is CEBFAD

  1. Correct Answer is: d)

The correct order of the sentences after rearrangement is CEBFAD

  1. Correct Answer is: e)

The correct order of the sentences after rearrangement is CEBFAD

  1. Correct Answer is: b)

The correct order of the sentences after rearrangement is CEBFAD

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