Crack SBI Clerk Prelims 2018 Sectional Full Test (English) Day-12

Dear Readers, SBI Clerk (Junior Associates) 2018 Preliminary Examination is scheduled to be held on 23rd, 24th, and 30th of June 2018. In that case, aspirants need to speed up the preparation as there are only few days more.

To boost up your exam preparation, Our IBPS Guide team is providing a full length Sectional Tests for English, Quantitative Aptitude and Reasoning with detailed solutions to score more marks in the prelims exam. Make use of this opportunity and recommend to your friends to achieve a successful career in Banking.

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Minimum Cut Off for this English Section Test is: 14

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Directions (1-10): Read the following passage carefully and answer the questions given below.

The recent Thoothukudi firings have been read as linear narratives, as specific reports without possessing the power of storytelling. The Thoothukudi violence needs a storyteller to capture the eloquence, the poignancy of anecdotes. One has to see the fables not as remote fragments, morsels of a marginal India, but as a microcosm of what is happening everywhere. Thoothukudi has to be treated as an early warning system for the emerging threats to Indian democracy.

One cannot even begin with a “once there was” because Thoothukudi is a collection of three tales. Time determines the depth and level of story. It is, first, a tale that began over 20 years ago when the Sterlite plant shifted from Maharastra to Tamil Nadu. It is also a tale that began 100 days before the firing, when housewives, children and villagers created a community of protest which found its one-lakh-strong epicentre at Thoothukudi. Yet the tale from Thoothukudi is just over a fortnight old when we focus around the scandal of the firings.

The euphemism of media reports is intriguing. They are generally dubbed as shootings or firings, they are not called killings, blatant acts of murder. The symbolism of a sniper and the needlessness of his violence no longer belongs to the Gaza strip. Terror is at home in Thoothukudi and elsewhere as state terror extends its tentacles world-wide.

Thoothukudi is global and local in a different sense. It reflects the new conversation between a decade of oral history, the complaints, the everyday gossip of people dying, of children fainting in school, the moment when the eventless history of environmentalism clashes with the trauma of the Internet. That the Internet was suspended in the area after the killings makes one realise that it is not in Kashmir alone that such events take place. Time becomes critical because suddenly the silence of waiting, the epidemic of little prayers, the little protests around every village combine to show that Sterlite is not just one company town but a state of mind. It introduces us to the company towns of the mind, the new panopticons which are spreading like dictatorships across the world. The ease with which environmental tribunals and scientific laboratories are subverted needs to be chronicled. Words such as sustainability or corporate social responsibility become acts of hypocrisy, the new oxymorons of ethics created by a corporate world indifferent to everyday suffering. As an ecologist friend of mine observes, there are more protests outside the Vedanta office in London than in India. It is almost as if patriotism and security are concepts designed to protect corporate greed.

As a fable, the events at Thoothukudi threaten the very fabric of democracy. It is a strange democracy where people are suspect and hunted down. As a DIG investigating Thoothukudi told me, “I have never seen a more cynical use of Section 144.” What the police confronted was a community of women and children carrying food, school bags. Instead of facing a community in a democratic sense, the government created the myth of outsiders as anti-socials. It is almost as if ordinary people are not citizens but subjects to be continuously disempowered. It is evident now that police went far beyond the area under Section 144 of the CrPC and killed people. Yet our bureaucrats hide truth behind the norms of procedure, as if table manners are more important than the truths of governance. The police reportedly beating disabled people makes one wonder if barbarity is a part of the new training, where every citizen is to be treated as a Naxal by definition. The psychology of fear that they have created is the new model of Section 144 where an old law and order project now becomes an effort to create an ecology of fear, where every citizen is suspect by definition.

In fact, it is around areas like Thoothukudi that one has to write the new history of violence around the body. The state of the body is symptomatic of the vulnerability of the body politic. Ironically, it is the people who look for democracy, while the state and Sterlite seek to subvert it. Words like ‘public and citizens’, once anchors of the democratic imagination, now have become suspect words in the new games of corporate life. Doctors who meet patients from Thoothukudi villages complaining of cancer, skin diseases call these symptoms ‘Sterlite symptoms’. In a similar way, we can talk of the symptoms of a ‘Sterlite democracy’, a disease as debilitating as majoritarian authoritarianism. Yet the answer to the death of democracy is a more intense democracy, stemming from the inventiveness of the community. We have to understand it is communities rather than movements which are resisting the regime, a fact that the regime finds difficult to respect.

Thoothukudi demonstrated this through the resilience of the bar and traders’ associations which worked day and night to get arrested people released. It reminded one of what the sociologist Èmile Durkheim said in his classic Professional Ethics and Civic Morals, that only the ethics of professions like law and medicine can counter the rapacity of corporations and the emptiness of the state. Thoothukudi proved this in ample measure. It also demonstrated that civil society has to be an embedded part of the new knowledge society. The reports of civil society have to become testaments and testimonies for the emerging issues of democracy. For example, the government inquiry commission, State Human Rights Commission or National Human Rights Commission reports are unlikely to go beyond legal and procedural issues. Civil society reports carry a wider burden and responsibility, playing sociologist, ethicist, environmentalist and storyteller. A civil society report on an act of violence has to relate law and order to law and justice, and also to law and democracy, reflecting on knowledge and truth in new ways. For example, experts should not be allowed to get away behind esoteric language. A people’s sensorium of touch, taste, smell has to be translated into science to create new warning signals. Thoothukudi showed the importance of a people’s idea of knowledge to counter expert knowledge. In fact, it suggests the importance of a people’s ombudsman to accompany so-called expert committees.

Yet such civil society reports cover not just past and present. They are warning bells for the future. If one juxtaposes the reports on Thoothukudi with the nuclear site at Koodankulam, one senses the deep suspicion about proactive citizenship. Government attempts to create the bogey of the outsider as antisocial, alien, intruder, missionary, Christian are dangerous steps and need to be challenged. The citizen as a person of knowledge must be seen as central to democracy. Only a proactive citizenship and an experimentally open civil society can challenge, question and domesticate the emerging “Sterlite democracies” as the new diseases of our age. This then is the emerging fable of Thoothukudi.

 

  1. Choose the synonym for Juxtaposes

a) couples

b) coples

c) distances

d) strolls

e) None of these.

  1. Choose the synonym for Poignancy

a) style

b) piquancy

c) blandness

d) insipidness

e) None of these.

  1. Choose the synonym for Euphemism

a) pride

b) prude

c) allegory

d) crude

e) None of these.

  1. Choose the antonym for Rapacity

a) gyration

b) altruism

c) avarice

d) voracity

e) None of these.

  1. Choose the antonym for Subvert

a) puffy

b) bolster

c) sabotage

d) filter

e) None of these.

  1. Choose the antonym for Cynical

a) brothel

b) sardonic

c) suspicious

d) naive

e) None of these.

  1. What is central theme of the passage?

a) Thoothukudi and govt.

b) What went wrong with Thoothukudi

c) Thoothukudi issue: an inspiration

d) both b and c

e) None of these.

  1. Which of the following is true?

a) The psychology of fear that they have burgeoned is the new model of Section 144 where an old law and order project now becomes an effort to create an ecology of fear, where every citizen is suspect by definition

b) We have to understand it is communities and movements which are resisting the regime, a fact that the regime finds difficult to respect.

c) Time becomes critical because suddenly the silence of awaiting, the epidemic of little prayers, the little protests around every village combine to show that Sterlite is not just one company town but a state of mind.

d) both a and c

e) None of these.

  1. Why has author mentioned section 144 in the passage?

a) To tell the reader its importance in the events leading up to recent developments

b) To make sure he exemplifies the situation in a doubled manner

c) To deny the concerns regarding democracy.

d) Both option a and b

e) None of these.

  1. Which of the following best describes tone of the author in the passage?

a) Rhetorical

b) Critical

c) Analytical

d) Subdued

e) None of these.

Direction (11– 15): Which of the phrases (a), (b), (c), (d) given below each sentence should replace the phrase printed in bold type to make the sentence grammatically correct? If the sentence is correct as it is mark (e) i.e. ‘No correction required’ as the answer

  1. Long Blockchain, the iced tea maker which last year changed its focus to blockchain, has been accused by Nasdaq of misleading investors.

a) , the iced tea maker who last year changed its focus to

b) , the iced tea maker that last year changed its focus to

c) , the iced tea maker that which last year changed its focus onto

d) , the iced tea maker which last year changed its focus onto

e) No correction required.

  1. The UK government is bracing itself for Unilever to pick Rotterdam although the final decision is not expected uptill after a board meeting next month.

a) although the final decision is not expected until after a

b) although the final decision is not expected till after the

c) though the final decision is not expected until after the

d) although the final decision is not expected uptill after a

e) No correction required.

  1. German consumer and chemicals group Henkel is handing shareholders the biggest dividend in its 142-year history after a bumper ran of sales growth but offered a cautious outlook for 2018.

a) run off sales growth but offered a cautious outlook for

b) ran of sales growth but offered a cautious outlook of

c) run of sales growth but offered a cautious outlook for

d) ran off sales growth but offered a cautious outlook of

e) No correction required.

  1. Anglo American announced its highest dividend in a decade and sharply lower debts as annual profits surged on the back of higher commodity prices and increased production.

a) decade and sharply lower debts as annual profits surged upon the back of higher

b) decade and sharply lower debts as annual profits surged in the back of higher

c) decade and sharply lower debts as annual profits surged along with the back of higher

d) decade and sharply lower debts as annual profits surged for the back of higher

e) No correction required.

  1. Two years ago, Indian industrialists, Bollywood stars, fashion designers and erstwhile royalty globbered at Rajasthan’s elegant Umaid Bhawan palace for the fifth anniversary of India’s first western-style luxury jewellery brand, owned by Nirav Modi.

a) fashion designers and erstwhile royalty gathering at

b) fashion designers and erstwhile royalty gatherings at

c) fashion designers and erstwhile royalty grothed at

d) fashion designers and erstwhile royalty gathered at

e) No correction required.

Directions (16-25): In the following passage there are blanks, each of which has been numbered. These numbers are printed below the passage and against each five words are suggested, one of which fits the blank appropriately. Find out the appropriate word in each case.

These are joyous days for Israel. As the Jewish state celebrates its 70th anniversary, it is enjoying sustained economic growth, its lowest unemployment rate in decades, __(16)__ high-tech exports and a growing list of international companies eager to set up research centres on its soil. In an unstable region, Israel is more secure than ever. Arab states around it are in chaos and regional powers including Egypt and Saudi Arabia are __(17)__to form alliances to confront Iran and Islamists. A procession of world leaders visits Jerusalem. Binyamin Netanyahu, its prime minister, is well received in capitals across the globe. Israel’s foreign relations have never seemed in such good health. This week’s relocation of the American embassy from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem is a moment of glory. And Israel even won the Eurovision Song Contest, despite not being in Europe. Much has contributed to Israel’s success. A transition from a centralised economy, beginning in 1985, kept it from an inflationary meltdown, while it also hung __(18)__to popular parts of its socialist legacy such as a free national-health service and a decent education system. A highly skilled workforce, including many young people trained by the Israeli army and 1m immigrants who arrived during the collapse of the Soviet Union, has built many high-tech businesses. Pressure on Israel to solve its conflict with the Palestinians, who share the same small parcel of land between the Mediterranean and Jordan river, has eased. Arab governments have other worries, and often value Israeli trade and security co-operation much more than paying lip service to the Palestinian cause. Donald Trump likes Israel just the way it is. But Israel should not celebrate too wildly. Israeli-Arabs, many of them poor, struggle to integrate. And ultra-Orthodox Jews, whose numbers are rising fast, often do not work. The two groups make up over 30% of the population, putting a __(19)__on Israel’s welfare state. Technological success is fuelling resentment among those left behind in the “old economy”. Infrastructure is creaking and public transport is __(20)__. Xenophobia towards non-Jews and African refugees is on the increase. Although this resembles the problems of most Western democracies, Israel faces unique challenges, too. It lacks a political consensus to draft a constitution that will safeguard its democracy. Unresolved contradictions of state and __(21)__allow the Orthodox rabbinate sole control over marriage and divorce. Israel’s concept of citizenship, based on serving as a haven for all Jews, is hopelessly outdated. Above all __(22)__the Palestinian issue. Foreign pressure on Israel may have subsided, but 4.5m demoralised and divided Palestinians live in Gaza and the West Bank. The good news is that Israel still has plenty of scope to develop its economy, particularly if it can find ways to __(23)__the groups that have been left behind. The bad news is that Mr Netanyahu, who has based his electoral success on divisive politics and the fear of Arabs, shows little __(24)__to use Israel’s moment of advantage to seek a __(25)__peace with Palestinians.

16).

a) corf

b) booming

c) mendacious

d) trolling

e) None of these.

17).

a) eager

b) soothe

c) disproportionate

d) reluctant

e) None of these.

18).

a) of

b) from

c) on

d) to

e) None of these.

19).

a) compress

b) health

c) deal

d) strain

e) None of these.

20).

a) original

b) dilapidated

c) mend

d) form

e) None of these.

21).

a) synagogue

b) cipher

c) truce

d) secular

e) None of these.

22).

a) precedes

b) recedes

c) retreats

d) looms

e) None of these.

23).

a) profound

b) integrate

c) segregate

d) divide

e) None of these.

24).

a) percussion

b) ardent

c) inclination

d) aversion

e) None of these.

25).

a) mule

b) mild

c) temporary

d) lasting

e) None of these.

Directions (26-30): Find out the error, if any. If there is no error, the answer is (e), i.e. No error. (Ignore the errors of punctuation, if any.)

  1. HSBC is capping bonuses for thousands of (a)/ operational staff globally to streamline (b)/ remuneration, just as former (c)/ chief executive Stuart Gulliver receives a bumper payout. (d)/ No error (e)

a) a

b) b

c) c

d) d

e) e

  1. The owner of Lucky Strike cigarettes (a)/ said profits rose 39 per cent in 2017, mainly (b)/ due to the acquisition off Reynolds American, (c)/ which was completed in July. (d)/ No error (e)

a) a

b) b

c) c

d) d

e) e

  1. The chief executive of France’s Veolia said Gabon’s “expropriation” of the (a)/ water and waste group’s business in the country risked damaging (b)/ long-term investment in Africa and that he (c)/ will sue to recover the company’s losses (d)/ No error (e)

a) a

b) b

c) c

d) d

e) e

  1. Computer-powered hedge funds shouldered much (a)/ of the blame for exacerbating turmoil in (b)/ markets this month but some are pointing the finger upon a (c)/ pillar of the financial system: the insurance sector (d)/ No error (e)

a) a

b) b

c) c

d) d

e) e

  1. Indonesia, the world’s biggest exporter of coal (a)/ used to generate power, is set to become the first country in Asia to (b)/ sell green bonds, undermining the tensions in the (c)/ nascent but fast-growing market (d)/ No error (e)

a) a

b) b

c) c

d) d

e) e

Answers:

Direction (1-10)

1). Correct Answer is: a)

2). Correct Answer is: b)

3). Correct Answer is: c)

4). Correct Answer is: b)

5). Correct Answer is: b)

6). Correct Answer is: d)

7). Correct Answer is: b)

Option b seems most plausible answer to this question.

8). Correct Answer is: d)

Both a and c are true as mentioned in the passage.

9). Correct Answer is: a)

Option a is correct as sec 144 played an important role in the recent developments.

10). Correct Answer is: b)

The author criticises the handling of entire issue. Hence, option b is correct.

Direction (11-15)

11). Correct Answer is: b)

Option b is grammatically correct.

12). Correct Answer is: a)

Option a is grammatically correct.

13). Correct Answer is: c)

Option c is grammatically correct.

14). Correct Answer is: e)

The usage done in given sentence is grammatically correct.

15). Correct Answer is: d)

Option d is grammatically correct.

Direction (16-25)

16). Correct Answer is: b)

Booming – prosperous

17). Correct Answer is: a)

Eager – keen

18). Correct Answer is: c)

On’ is correct usage here.

19). Correct Answer is: d)

Strain – pressure

20). Correct Answer is: b)

Dilapidated – broken

21). Correct Answer is: a)

Synagogue – temple

22). Correct Answer is: d)

Looms – approaches

23). Correct Answer is: b)

Integrate – combine

24). Correct Answer is: c)

Inclination – liking

25). Correct Answer is: d)

Lasting – permanent

Direction (26-30)

26). Correct Answer is: e)

Given sentence is correct

27). Correct Answer is: c)

‘Acquisition of’ is correct usage.

28). Correct Answer is: b)

‘Country risks’ is correct usage.

29). Correct Answer is: c)

‘Finger at’ is correct usage.

30). Correct Answer is: c)

‘Underling the’ is correct usage.

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